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20121202
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Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)
with respect to united nations convention on this they are fairly outrageous. and what they're looking for, at the end of the day is respect, respect out the table and respect for who they are and what they are doing. and semi-we can define the means to bring these two solitudes together because at the end of the day any conflicts, whether it's kinetic or otherwise, that adversely affects the sultry to that part of the world will have a fundamentally adverse impact on the global economy spent it's doing it now with china and japan. that's interesting, as you've got two of the biggest economies in the world in a nightmare situation that raises a fundamental question, and it's of ending this myth that economics draws people closer together. part of the title today is "mischief or miscalculation?." during the cold war, what was interesting is you can have 17 different spheres of contact with the soviets and if two and if to implement you it's about 15 others. there was a lot of heavy investment figuring out how to communicate and how to coordinate, how to deal with escalation, how do you talk
to the senator and i understand colleagues on the other side of the aisle have concerns about the united nations and i respect that. we've had the space before, but i'm having difficulty finding where the threat gains any reality the senator has described specifically with respect to children the senator mentioned the question of the committee being created and sometimes committee make recommendations outside the purview of something. while that may be true, but when have words -- i guess the senator, when have words or suggestions that have no power, they cannot be implemented, but have no access to the courts, that have no effect on the web the united states and cannot change the lot of the united states, when has that ever threatened anybody in our country? >> one of the united states ratifies -- >> does the senator agreed there's no power to change our love? >> no, i don't agree. >> and the senator show where it is specifically when the supreme court has held this is not self-executing. there's no access to american courts when it is clear by the statements of the treaty itself there's no la
to national prominence in fdr's proposed second bill of rights and finally they were adopted in the united nations universal declaration of human rights after world war ii thanks in part to eleanor roosevelt who helped draft the un declaration after her husband's death. today more than 70 countries recognize a right to health or health care in their constitution. virtually every industrialized nation has taken steps to implement these rights by establishing some type of universal health coverage for their citizens with one major exception. anybody know? the united states of america. it is not for lack of trying. after fdr's death, president harry truman announced a national health insurance program that would have made medical coverage for all part of the social security act but the physicians of the american medical association attacked the plan as socialized medicine. that might also sound familiar. in the early cold war the a m a won that battle and truman's proposal. other presidents including richard nixon and bill clinton tried to pass universal health care programs but they failed d
last 22 years to find out how we did it, what they can do. so here was the united nations who said okay, we'll come up with a convention, a treaty, all countries, put it out for them to sign up which encourages them to pale actually emulate what we did. this would have given us a seat at the table. we would be sitting at the table, helping other countries to bring their laws more up to what ours are in terms of the rights of people with disabilities. but we turned our backs on that. turned our backs on it. you know, mr. president, if -- there are a lot of things that make america a shining city on a hill but there's one thing that no one can dispute that does put america as a shining city on a hill, and that is the americans with disabilities act, and what it has done to our society. like our civil rights act. what it's done to break down the barriers and to show that people with disabilities can contribute to society, if only given the chance and the opportunity. i would think that we would want for them to then say yes, we'll be a part of a worldwide effort to break down those barrier
/palestine conflict. it includes nearly the whole of the united nations, the most respected legal bodies in the world such as the international court of justice and the most respected human rights organizations such as amnesty international and human rights watch. this consensus calls for a two-state settlement on the june 1967 border, that is a full israeli withdrawal from the whole of the west bank, gads saw and east jerusalem with minor and mutual land swaps and address the refugee question based on the right of return and compensation. the consensus is grounded in basic and uncontroversial principles of international law and human rights. the framework of international law and human rights also forms the bedrock of american liberalism to which jews have disproportionately contributed. it is consequently within reach, it's now within reach to win over american jews on this political solution or at least the shame them into supporting such a solution. but it is inconceivable that american jews can be won over to any solution that entails the coercive dissolution of israel as a state. the current co
people was also in the core and the national security interest of the united states and the region. moreover, this change would align with our values of supporting the space process and the basic rights and freedoms that should be enjoyed by all people regardless of religion, ethnicity and gender. over the course of the past 20 months, the al-assad regime has unleashed a barrage of terror across the country with the plane of remaining in power. we are just hearing about in last couple of days, the last couple of hours more urgently about weapons of mass destruction and what that could mean. more than 40,000, we know that is a conservative number. more than 40,000 syrians have been killed, and countless have been injured. refugees have surged into neighboring turkey, jordan, lebanon and iraq taxing the limits of those countries capacities and creating a regional crisis. the escalation of violence has reached a point where the fighter jets have been used to kill civilians standing in bread line according to the human rights watch. it's hard to comprehend that happening in any country
of systemic violations of human rights. iran has refused access to the united nations for several years, and the ug general assembly submitted a report in which he said he was, quote, deeply troubled by increased numbers of executions. a pew addition, arbitrary arrests and detention, unfair trials, torture, and ill treatment, and crackdown on human rights activityist, lawyers, journalist, and opposition activists, and to draw an example from the week's news theres actually what i gas what qualifies in iran for a slight bit of goodness. a well-known human rights lawyer ended her 49-day hunger strike on december 4th. her name is nasarn, and she has in prison since 2010, and the regime imposed a travel ban on her husband and her daughter so she was on a hunger strike for 49 days, and has actually stopped the hunger strike amid word the regime is going to lift the travel ban. so, the victories are small and hard-on and the news is relentlessly negative, but it comes at an interesting moment both for iran, which has apartmently elections next june, typically during periods of time when there
that reflects the will of the syrian people is also the core national security interests of the united states in the region. moreover this change would align with our values supporting the democratic process, the basic rights and freedom that should be enjoyed by all people regardless of religion, ethnicity or gender. over the course of the last 20 months the assad regime has unleashed a barrage of unspeakable terror across the country with the sole aim of remaining in power. just hearing in the last couple days, more urgently about weapons of mass destruction and what that could mean. more than 40,000 syrians have been killed, cal was have been injured. refugees surged into neighboring turkey, jordan, lebanon and iraq taxing the limits of those countries and creating a regional crisis. assad's escalation of violence has reached the point where fighter jets have been used to kill civilians according to human-rights watch. hard to comprehend that happening in any country but that is what has played out. this regime's shocking capacity for widespread terror will only grow as we see reports that
threat to the united states' national security. as chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, i got asked that all the time. i answered in two words: our debt. i think i surprised him. today 15 former senior national security officials who served across eight presidential administrations have formed a coalition to stress the need for elected officials to act. for not only has the passage of time exacerbated some of the economic problems, it has revealed a perhaps equally-dangerous political one. our inability to grapple with pressing fiscal challenges represents nothing less than a crisis in our democratic order. compounding the instability and unpredictability in a volatile world. our propositions for this coalition are simple. the national security of the united states depends on its economic health. that health must be insured by averting the immediate crises and by laying the groundwork for a rigorous, long-term program of debt reduction, smart investment, economic growth and lower income inequality. in national security spending, we can target investments much more efficiently in res
this into an abortion debate is wrong on substance and bad politics. as to the united nations, i've heard people people say that ratifying the convention would take decisions out of parents' hands and let the u.n. or the federal government decide what's best for our children and that's just wrong. the treaty doesn't give the federal government or any state government new powers. with regard to children with disabilities and the treaty cannot be used as a basis for a lawsuit in state or federal court. former attorney general dick thornburgh made this crystal clear in his testimony before the senate foreign relations committee and in every conversation i've had with him. i would support the treaty if -- i wouldn't support the treaty if it were any other way. let's take a step back and look how this looks if america jeects this treaty. china has joined, russia has joined. we are the country that set the standards on rights for the -- of the disabled. we want everybody to play by international rules. we lose credibility if we turn around and refuse to participate in a treaty that merely asks other nations
nation is actually wrestling -- [inaudible] a large amount of debt the united states is facing. i will outline the challenge we face. i'll also show you some transforming health care is one of the ways we can solve that issue. i'll demonstrate how new approaches to integrating the delivery system and how it is already achieving some result outside of the federal government. the health care can harness simplicity, has sustainability, even if the health care system undergoes some significant transformations. first, but to take a moment and talk about ohio and cleveland and how they're addressing some of these large issues here locally. particularly a recently announced demonstration of integrating care for coverage for the dual eligible. the dual eligible or individuals covered by medicare and medicaid. i don't know if you know this, but dual eligible operation represents 20% of the medicare population today and 31% of the cost. with excited to be part of this program under the strategic partnership with the company in dayton called care stories will be serving beneficiaries in clev
of systemic violations of human rights. iran has refused access to the united nations special rapporteur on human rights for for several years now. september 2011 the u.n. general submitted a report in which he said he was deeply troubled by reports of increased numbers of executions come amputations, arbitrary arrest and detention, unfair trials, torture and ill-treatment in a crackdown on human rights activists, lawyers, an opposition that exists. just to draw one prefix ample from the weeks news, there is actually a guess what qualifies in iran briefly is good news, a well-known human rights lawyer ended her 49 day hunger strike on december 4th. her name is nazarene to show day. she has been imprisoned in prison since 20 tenanted machine had imposed a travel ban on her has been an-year-old daughter, sushi was on a hunger strike for 49 days and has actually stopped the hunger strike amid an indication they will risk the travel ban. so the victories are a small and hard won and the news is relentlessly negative. but it comes at an interesting moment vote for iran, which has parliamentar
with china, they started to claim the island in 1971 after the united nations issued a report in 1969. there's potential where result exists in that area. and we have been, we -- in 1895, about 420. and for the first 75 years we have never received any claim from the republic of china, and after the u.n. report, they changed his position on this subject to claim the island. today, i don't want to get into the details of the island. this is forum and just have global nervous. but i'd like to point, you know, the audience to the two elements. this is not -- in south china sea, china is trying to advance. with the philippines and vietnam and other countries. they claim the islands at least in south china sea. east china sea there is an issue with japan. and from japan, -- [inaudible] the taiwan, the philippines, this is called -- from the viewpoint of china. violence exists in the pacific. china openly express their strong interest in the maritime security and also the territory along those islands. so these china sea, this is not isolated when. this is a kind of china military strategy to adva
will collect the national parks which of the most pitiful quarters ever made by the united states y are so phenomenally bear that most people that have been making the sport three years. this is your opportunity to not get as good an opportunity price but also to have one that is the ultimate holiday in the ultimate price that only $99.95 for over $250 value that you will have right there. it is personal american history for the cost of the we will fill that with 50-- of quarters. all sold out limited editions. this has been made in the most 15 years. >>host: when san tab comes, getting cold in their stocking, who does not gold?-- santa >>host: finale to have the value in just a 24 k mac layer old witch's son in and of course, sold lamented edition for $33.32,6 c13 three months but let us also think about you do still an extended holiday return policy all the way until january 31st but we do offer a 30 day money back guarantee but we're going to double that. like always jokes but when you say turn your back, it is your calling.we do not have to worry about that, you shop with confidence
, the united nations, neighboring states and others in the international community to prepare a military response in accordance with international law to address the threats of terrorist and extremist in northern mali. the threat of military force has contributed we think to the change to some of the northern coups as witnessed by the recent willingness of them and l.a. and others to renounce their efforts to establish an independent state in northern mali. the military concept imposed and endorsed by the african union provides a foundation for planning a post-military intervention in northern mali. however, several key questions must be answered to ensure that this response is well planned, well-resourced and appropriate. these issues include among other things, the required force levels, the cost of funding, the logistical requirements, the operational timeliness, the protection of civilians and ensuring that the proposed military action is adequately linked to a political strategy and an end state for military operations and authority. we have sent military planners to assist with the
lands. stand up for those who cannot stand up for themselves. this is not about the united nations. this is about common humanity. and this vote is to test whether the senate will stand up for those who cannot see or hear and whether senators can hear the truth and see the facts. please don't let captain brzynski down, please don't let senator bob dole down. most importantly, don't let the senate and the country down. approve this treaty. the presiding officer: the question occurs on the resolution of advice and consent to ratification of the convention on the rights of persons with disabilities. a senator: mr. president? i ask for the yeas and nays. the presiding officer: is there a sufficient second? there appears to be. the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: vote: vote: the presiding officer: on this vote the yeas are 61, the nays are 38, two-thirds of the senators present not having voted in the affirmative, the resolution of ratification is not agreed to. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: both senator mcconnell and i have approv
of these foreign national students trained in these stem fields to stay here in the united states and help create jobs here in the united states. this bill actually goes a step further, and what it does is it provides them a green card, a green card, which is the first step toward a path to citizenship. if you believe that this is a self-inflicted wound on our economy, you're exactly right, our current policy. we're educating brilliant students and then compelling them to go to work in shanghai or singapore rather than san antonio or the silicon valley. meanwhile, we're handing out tens of thousands of diversity visas to immigrants chosen by a random lottery, without regard to any qualifications they might when it comes to job creation and entrepreneurship. it makes absolutely no sense. i believe we need an immigration policy that serves our national interest. and if there's one thing that we need more than anything else now is we need job creators and entrepreneurs in the united states. and we know in the -- in the global economy, it's people with the special skills in science, technology, engin
in a volatile world. ever proposition is simple. the national security in the united states depends on its economic health. that must be ensured by averting the immediate crisis, and by laying the ground short for the rigorous long-term program of the debt reduction, smart investment, economic growth, and lower income inequality. in the national security spending, we can target investments much more efficiently than response to threats that are evolving before our eyes. and resources need to be shifted towards them on military elements of the national security posture. in the immediate term, and by that i mean over the next four weeks, we must avoid driving the country over the fiscal cliff. no partisan ideology is worth the cost to the nation. but just averting disaster and kicking the can on the tough structural decisions needed to place our economy on sound footing for the future is not enough. we are calling for a framework to build out over the last ten years to reduce the deficit and restructure the fiscal policy. succumb as eventually to bring the budget into balance they must raise
the archivist it ended special collections and archives and faculty members of the school. there's no national death penalty archive for documenting the fascinating history of capital punishment in the united states, so we set forth to establish the first. and what we do is we reach out to key organizations, significant individuals who are working either to abolish capital punishment or are proponents of capital punishment. and these individuals and organizations for the ideas that spring the debate that goes on, both in the legal arena and political agreement over the the death penalty. what i want to show you from the national death penalty archive today is a collection from a gentleman whose name is -- is recognized as the foremost historian of the death penalty in the united states. he began doing research in the death penalty in the late 1960s while he was a traveling salesman. became so passing with crime and capital punishment. and at that time he was a proponent of the death penalty. but he became so fascinated with the topic of the death penalty that he quit his job as a traveling sal
, it's worth that to families across the united states. for the good of this nation, for the good of the economy, for the good of these working families, for goodness sakes, pass this measure, this bipartisan measure that passed the senate last july. get this part done. we can debate the rest, but give peace of mind to meese working families and -- but give peace of mind to these working families and middle-income families that they're not going it see their income tax go up. madam president, i yield the floor. madam president, i ask unanimous consent to speak on a separate issue to be placed in a separate place in the record. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. durbin: madam president, it was a disappointing day yesterday when the united states senate failed by five votes to pass the convention on disabilities. it is a measure that i'd worked on with former california congressman tony coehlo, who has been an outstanding advocate for the disabled in america. throughout his career in congress and since. but it was also an effort toker one particular end -- for one particu
in some sort of depth the various national security challenges facing the united states, and in the case, not only the united states but also the african continent. when you look at the area of responsibility africom has, it's so-ing, in terms of complexity and geography. many of you are well aware, at least this informed audience, that counterterrorism is still an issue the united states needs to take seriously. i think for some, with respect to africa, came to light with the tragic events in ben georgia circumstance but as general ham well knows, this has been challenging the united states and others for quite some time. the terrorist threat has metastasized. ding-dong, the witch is not dead, referring to osama bin laden. you see threats move and gravitate to un and understood protected areas. obviously al qaeda some the islamic maghreb seems to be on the march. they're spread and the al qaeda arabian peninsula, operating out of yemen, and one of these more or less undergoverned spaces. lots of opportunity but lots of concern. whether it's narcostates in the south, to huge challenges w
national, the destruction of slavery in the united states 1861-1855, james oakes, history professor at city university of new york argues that slavery was the foremost reason for the civil war. walter bender, charles cain, jody corners, and neil donahue who all contributed to creating the company one laptop per child was that a company history and provided an outline for other social of japan yours in learning to change the world, the social impact of one lap top per child. in napoleon, left a legacy, and
as well as the united states army and the montana national guard. he earned several recognitions for his valor, including the bronze star medal, purple heart, army commendation medal and army good conduct medal. since 2009, he worked as a full-time instructor with the north dakota national guard's 164th regional training institute camp grafton training center in devil's lake. sergeant first class lindy was a devoted and selfless leader as well as a committed family man. he enjoyed spending time with his family and friends. and he is survived by his wife adrienne and four children. specialist tyler orguard of bismarck, north dakota, joined the north dakota national guard shortly before his 2011 graduation from bismarck century high school, where he was a member of the century patriots wrestling team and began competing in the impact fighting championships. he was passionate about training in mixed martial arts and his family and friends knew him to be an extremely disciplined, hardworking man who served his country with great pride. this was specialist orguard's first overseas deployment.
the united states to formally recognize the national coalition is the sole legitimate representative of the syrian people. we are working very hard with the leadership of the coalition to make adjustments to perhaps introduce quotas as a temporary measure to make sure we are adequately represented at the syrian society and we want to push forward to begin assuming functions of this state is supporting the local councils that are cropping up. >> okay. we need to go in q&a. one quick thing before we start but i hope it's some point in this day someone will address the question of, how you mention the hope that some remnant to see would be involved in an effort to coalesce from government. .. excellent description ever what at least that body would like to see the united states stand for with regard to syria. perhaps i'd like to comment the panelists to see what the bipartisan unanimous measure might add to the clarity of the u.s. vision at blueprint for what we want to see next presending from all the shall we say tactical and diplomatic and other considerationings we have been discuss
another big round of applause for the united states marine band. [applause] >> at this time i want to introduce to you the producer, director of the film "honor flight," mr. dan hayes. [applause] >> thank you so much to the friends of the national wwii memorial and the national park service for having me here today. what an honor to be here with all of you to remember such an important day in our history. it was about three years ago i wandered down to this memorial with my video camera right over there by the atlantic builder. and as a world war ii veteran -- asked a world war ii veteran a pretty simple question. i said how is your day going? he looked at me with the utmost sincerity, with his eyes, and he said i could die a happy man now that i've made this trip. that answer was the beginning of an incredible journey for me. it served as an inspiration to make a documentary about communities across the country that have pulled together, since these veterans now in their 80s and '90s, on a trip to d.c. to see their own memorial. these trips were called on their flights. as many of
of allegiance to the flag. i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the presiding officer: the clerk will read a communication to the senate. the clerk: washington, d.c, december 6, 2012. to the senate: under the provisions of rule 1, paragraph 3, of the standing rules of the senate, i hereby appoint the honorable tom udall, a senator from the state of new mexico, to perform the duties f the chair. signed: daniel k. inouye, president pro tempore. mr. reid: mr. president? the presiding officer: the majority leader is recognized. mr. reid: following leader remarks, which will be in a period of morning business until 11:45 today. senators will be permitted to speak for up to ten minutes each. we would like that time to be for speeches for our retiring senators. at 11:45, the senate will move to consider the nominations of walker and berg, judges. we expect only two roll call votes since we hope the berg nomination will be confirmed by voice. mr. president, we democr
. such a chain reaction is not in a national interest of the united states. the solution to this problem requires renewed american leadership or partnership to increase the development of resources that lag across the south caucasus. and central asia as well as the infrastructure, the pipelines and other things needed to transport these resources. i would also like to elaborate a little bit more about bahrain. we have some people on the panel today that we will ask questions about bahrain. and they have some intimate knowledge of some of the problems that have taken place there, and as i said before, the concerns that we have in the car cases, the whole region is only a part of the concern that we feel for the region. bahrain has been an ally of the united states for a long, long time. we have our fifth -- and the attempts by iranians to work with dissident forces there in bahrain to undermine the government is something that we must be concerned about. i talked to the leadership over there, and they are concerned about the problems that some of the people feel toward the government and they have
themselves and their unit manager, between themselves in those who are making the policies or those calling the shots on a national level. they don't feel empowered and we are seeing more variability because of that. >> host: you talk in your book about the administrative crack downs if you will, where you get providers of care and senior administrative leaders working a little bit more together or getting the administrators out from their offices if you will. talk a little bit about that in what and what you see the value of that being as well as its impact if you will on the quality. >> guest: you know we all want the same thing. doctors, administrators, insurance companies, policymakers. there is an astronaut from outer space who was asked, what does the middle east look like from outer space? the astronaut said you know there are no lines when you look at it. the lines are man-made and that is what is going on in health care. the lines we have made in health care or man-made. we don't want the same good for the public. we have got good people. there it is sometimes working in this artif
've looked at the 20 leading democracies, the old oecd, and i looked at 30 key indicators of national well being and global citizenship, and i was startled, frankly, to find that the united states is at the bottom, the very bottom or next to the bottom on all 30 of these indicators of national performance. so it follows that if we want to change the direction the country's headed and build this attractive future for our children and grandchildren, we were going to have to change the system. we've got to drive this systemic, transformative change until we have, in effect, the new system of political economy, a new operating system for america, one that delivers good results for human and natural communities, but otherwise we've got to embed new and different priorities at the core of our political economy. and to do that, i think we've first got to understand what are the elements of this operating system that we have today that are driving us into this sea of troubles, the forces that must be changed? well, in general it's the titanic forces unleashed by america's ruthless and rapacious br
a former chief justice of the connecticut supreme court, a former united states attorney, several partners at major connecticut and national law firms, an academic, business leaders and community leaders throughout the state. their insights and hard work throughout the process were really invaluable to my colleague from connecticut and i, and i express on this floor my gratitude to them for their service. based on the work of the advisory panel and our review of its recommendations, senator blumenthal and i recommended michael shea to the president for nomination. i will say that michael was ranked very high among the applicants, highly qualified applicants for this position by all members of the advisory panel, and i should say here right at the outset that we are grateful to president obama for nominating him for this place on our court. michael shea is a native of west hartford, connecticut, a graduate of amherst college and yale law school, served as a clerk to judge james buckley, though a resident of connecticut, sat on the u.s. court of appeals for the district of columbia. michael
you. i really appreciate the opportunity to address each one of you. as we talked today, our nation is actually wrestling with one of the largest issues, probably in a long time. that's our debt, and the large amount of debt that the united states is facing today. i will outline the challenge we face. i will also show you transforming health care in the ways we can solve this debt issue. i'll demonstrate approaches in the delivery system and how it's already achieving results outside of the federal government. i'll describe how health care can harness simplicity to have stability as we undergo transformation. first, i want to take a moment and talk about ohio. and cleveland. how they are addressing some of the large issues here locally. particularly, the recently announce the demonstration of integrating care coverage. they are individuals to be covered by medicare and medicaid. i don't know if you know this, but duel eligible population represents 20% of the medicare population today, but 31% of the cost. we are excited to be a part of the program under a strategic partnership. a c
were running congress when we had a like nafta, china's most favorite nation status, the jvc, the world trade organization. all these trade deals people claim were going to bring jobs to the united states and in every case, the jobs left.
little experience in history of united states that would allow the navy and the army to work as partners on the singleton. we have to remember the of course the national security act of 1947, post-world war ii phenomenon that created the joint chiefs of staff, secretary of defense. during the civil war, in world war ii there was a secretary of war who was responsible for the army, and secretary of the navy, responsible for the navy who sat as co-equals on the cabinet table and they were members of the coalition press. they were on the same side without a doubt, but they were hardly partners. i became very clear early on to not only was halleck, general can't be done, jealous of his own command. he wanted to keep the forces under his own immediate control which he believed a need to capture this road a. but in addition to navy was equally jealous of partnering with the army. they didn't want to do. secretary of the navy was absolutely determined whenever possible that the navy should do things without upping the army. it was just that they couldn't do without the army. they really saw to
to commit to balance plan, to bring our national debt back down to sustainable levels. the united states, i believe come is at a critical juncture. we can come together, show the world we are still responsible actors. we can prove that america is still the leader of a global economy. people are watching. do we still have it. or, we can let a instruction is an and stagnation turn this country that we all love so much into a second place state. i spent a few days last fall meeting with the european leaders as they are about a week meeting of finance ministers, head of european commission, anybody can talk to try to get europe, both countries, as well as germany and finland, each with different points of view. also all the common view, they've got to find a way to work out all their differences to save the hero. and i believe they will. you can just see it, feel it, read between the lines, they are going to find a way. they will muddle through but they will find a way to get it done. these countries are also looking to us to be. and we need to lead. europe shows us the danger of uncertainty. w
or tornadoes or earthquakes around the country. we are united, as a united states of america as senator menendez has said. hurricane azande's scale and scope of destruction made it one of the largest national disasters to affect our nation leaving millions of people in the tristate region without homes or electricity and costing tens of billions of dollars in damages to governments, businesses, and residence. the sweat -- the suite of destruction and human impact and financial impact was simply staggering, and our response now has to match. we need to think big and act paid with urgency and division right away. short term. we must redouble our efforts to reduce the personal cost and property damage of the storm and other storms and long review the path toward enlightened protection and preparation must include infrastructure improvements. m.a.c. massive, but they are well needed and deserved such as has been done with stanford, connecticut floodgate repairs, steps to stop flooding on the plus atomic river and electricity security measures such as the establishment of micrograms and incr
Search Results 0 to 36 of about 37 (some duplicates have been removed)